Ennio Morricone is dead – DIGITAL TELEVISION

Image: © Printemps - Fotolia.com
Image: © Printemps – Fotolia.com

The film music devised by Ennio Morricone is one of the classics of cinema history. Now the Italian died in Rome. His most famous composition is probably the melancholic harmonica from “Play me the song of death”.


The Italian composer Ennio Morricone, known for his unforgettable film music, is dead. He died early Monday morning in Rome at the age of 91, a family lawyer confirmed on Monday at the German Press Agency.

Morricone, who was born in the Roman district of Trastevere and also enjoyed touring as a conductor, had achieved worldwide fame in the 1960s when he started working with Sergio Leone. In the years that followed, he wrote the soundtrack for the director’s large spaghetti westerns – from “Play me the song of death” to “A handful of dollars” to “Two glorious scoundrels”.

Even for classics like “The Mission” and “Once Upon a Time in America” ​​- with Hollywood star Robert de Niro in the leading role – the man with the striking glasses devised impressive and moving melodies. The delicate oboe sounds with which Jeremy Irons, alias Father Gabriel, contacts the Guarani people in “The Mission” brought the multiple award-winning Morricone one of his multiple Oscar nominations and a Golden Globe.

Despite all the nominations, the composer, who studied at the Roman Conservatory in Santa Cecilia, only received the coveted Oscar statue at the age of 87 – for his soundtrack to Quentin Tarantino’s western “The Hateful 8”, whose snowy landscapes he had staged in an atmospheric setting . In 2007 he already held the Oscar in his hands, but not for film music, but for his life’s work.

“I only work with directors for whom I feel friendship and respect,” Morricone once said. These included Bernardo Bertolucci, Brian De Palma and Roman Polanski. Ultimately, however, only one thing is important, said the maestro, namely “that the composer always remains true to himself”.

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