Netflix and Amazon denounce an IPTV service that offered pirated channels

Members of the anti-piracy association Alliance for Creativity and Entertainment (ACE), among which are Disney, Paramount, Amazon, Warner, Universal, Netflix, Columbia and StudioCanal, have taken legal action against TTKN Enterprises, LLC, better known as the IPTV Crystal Clear Media (CCM). Todd and Tori Smith of Florida are named in the complaint as the owners and operators of the service.

They broadcast movies and series 24 hours a day on cyclical IPTV channels

This service sold, through retailers, unauthorized access to copyrighted movies and television series. Among them were channels that broadcast 24-hour marathons of movies like Frozen II, the Harry Potter saga, more recent releases like Bad Boys for Life, or the Mr. Robot series.

The lawsuit states that both were profiting knowing that what they were doing was illegal. Among the websites that offered the service were mediahosting.one, crystalcleariptv.com, ccmedia.one, ccbilling.org, cciptv.us, ccreborn.one, ccultimate.one, superstreamz.com and webplayer.us.

There were monthly plans that started from $ 10 a month

These websites were retailers who bought credits from the owners, and then converted them into access accounts for the customers who bought the service. Among those services we find prices that started in one month for 10 dollars, three months for 25 dollars, six months for 45 dollars, and 12 months for 80 dollars on one of the websites. Most of the websites have already been closed.

Therefore, the plaintiffs ask up to $ 150,000 for each content whose copyright has been infringed, although depending on the amounts won, the figure can be significantly reduced as determined by the judge.

These types of demands had been quite atypical on the part of streaming platforms until a couple of years ago. Netflix, for example, did not undertake great actions against piracy, but since they have begun to create their own content in a wild way, now they do have an interest in safeguarding their copyrights and preventing the piracy of their movies and series. The same occurs with Amazon Prime Video, which is betting to nurture its catalog of films, series and documentaries, having acquired exclusive rights to create the documentary by Fernando Alonso, or to create the series The Lord of the Rings.

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